Australia news LIVE: Global economy at risk of stagflation; Experts call abortion access in rural Australia ‘dire’; Russia strikes on Kyiv during G7 meeting

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Abortion access in parts of Australia remains ‘very dire’, experts say

Accessing abortion is still a postcode lottery for women across regional Australia 12 months after South Australia became the final jurisdiction in the country to make abortion legal, experts say.

As reverberations were felt internationally with the overturning of Roe v Wade in the United States, former NSW Minister Andrew Constance warned it served as a timely reminder of the need to safeguard laws decriminalising abortion from those who would seek to reverse them.

Protests have erupted in the US after the overturning of Roe v Wade by the Supreme Court.Credit:AP

As the Leader of the (NSW) House when this conscience vote occurred, I can assure you there are people in parliament today who would take any opportunity to do so,” Constance told The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

The decision by the US Supreme Court to overturn the landmark decision of 1973 brings to an end the constitutional right to an abortion and is expected to severely curtail women’s reproductive rights across the United States.

Victoria decriminalised abortion in 2008 and NSW did the same in 2019. However, experts said efforts to ensure equitable access to abortions in regional communities have not kept pace with the legislative change.

Western Australia was the first state to make abortion legal in 1998 for pregnancies up to 20 weeks. However, it has not been fully decriminalised and remains within the criminal code.

Read the full article here.

National gender pay gap analysis paints bleak picture for women

The gender pay gap is about $40,000 a year for people aged 45 to 65, while women who reach senior executive roles are taking home nearly $100,000 less per year on average than their male counterparts.

Working mum Connie Craparotta job-shares with a colleague so she can take care of her three children, Marc, Luca and Emilia.Credit:James Alcock

An Australia-wide analysis of the gender pay gap by the federal government’s Workplace Gender Equality Agency paints a bleak picture of the state of gender equality in the private sector, publishing new data that shows women are still earning consistently less than men in every age bracket.

The agency’s new data report, called Wages and Ages: Mapping the Gender Pay Gap by Age, shows the pay gap widens substantially when women turn 35, with women earning $7.78 for every $10 earned by their male counterparts. The disparity worsens over the next 20 years, with a slight improvement once women turn 65, but never reaching parity.

If these trends continue, Millennial women in the workforce will earn just 70 per cent of men’s earnings by the time they reach age 45.

A combination of factors is driving the pay disparity, the agency’s director, Mary Wooldridge said. Many low-paying jobs in the care and education sectors are dominated by women, but this only contributes to about 20 per cent of the pay gap problem, the agency has found. The bigger drivers are discrimination and the fact that women spend more time outside the workforce to care for children and family.

Read the full article here.

Global economy ‘flashing red’, warns world’s central bank

Global economic indicators are flashing red with a real risk of stagflation, one of the world’s most senior economists has warned, and highly indebted Australians are among the most exposed to rising prices and slowing growth.

In analysis that suggests the federal government will struggle to meet its pre-election promises around real wages growth and budget repair, the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) used its annual report, released on Sunday to warn of a global “regime shift” that could lead to a repeat of the economic turmoil of the 1970s.

The bank, which acts as a central bank to the world’s central banks, said the war in Ukraine and the disruption of global supply chains caused by the COVID-19 recession were also feeding into longer-term inflation pressures that would weigh on the global economy.

The BIS said wages growth was adding to inflation as workers, facing cost of living pressures, demanded sizeable increases in pay rates. Businesses were willing to pass on those wage costs through higher prices.

This “red light” warning suggested central banks would have to slow economic growth deliberately.

Read the full article here.

Today’s headlines at a glance

Good morning and thanks for your company.

It’s Monday, June 27. I’m Ashleigh McMillan and I’ll be anchoring our live coverage for the first half of the day.

Here’s what you need to know before we get started.

  • Global economic indicators are flashing red with a real risk of stagflation, one of the world’s most senior economists has warned, with highly indebted Australians among the most exposed to rising prices and slowing growth. The Bank for International Settlements has used its annual report to warn of a global “regime shift” that could lead to a repeat of 1970s economic turmoil.

  • Crossbench senators are considering joining forces next month to disrupt government debate in parliament’s first sitting week and hand the government an embarrassing loss of control as the prime minister digs in on his decision to cut the number of advisers for independents and minor parties.
  • An Australia-wide analysis of the gender pay gap by the federal government’s Workplace Gender Equality Agency paints a bleak picture of the state of gender equality in the private sector, publishing new data that shows women are still earning consistently less than men in every age bracket. The gender pay gap is about $40,000 a year for people aged 45 to 65.
  • Accessing abortion is still a postcode lottery for women across regional Australia 12 months after South Australia became the final jurisdiction in the country to make abortion legal, experts say.
  • Russia shattered weeks of relative calm in the Ukrainian capital with long-range missiles fired toward Kyiv, an apparent Kremlin show-of-force as Western leaders meet in Europe to strengthen their military and economic support of Ukraine.
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