Boris STILL hasn't congratulated Macron on his French election win

Day two of Le Snub: Boris Johnson STILL hasn’t congratulated Emmanuel Macron on his French election win but Downing Street denies the relationship has cooled after rows over Brexit and Channel migrant crossings

  • Macron saw off far-right rival Marine Le Pen in French presidential election
  • Joe Biden, Germany’s Olaf Scholz and China’s Xi Jinping have called the Elysee
  • No10 said there was no call scheduled today between Macron and Mr Johnson 

Downing Street continued to play down talk of a rift with France today as officials confirmed Boris Johnson has still not spoken to Emmanuel Macron in the wake of his re-election.

Macron saw off far-right rival Marine Le Pen in the second round of the French presidential election at the weekend.

But despite leaders including Joe Biden, Germany’s Olaf Scholz and even China’s Xi Jinping calling the Elysee to congratulate him on his second term, No10 said there was no call scheduled today.

Mr Macron, 44, clashed with the Prime Minister in recent months as he sought to see off hard-right challenger Marine Le Pen.

There have been stand-offs over fishing rights and also the way French authorities have failed to stem the tide of small boat crossings, despite taking millions of pounds off the UK Government.

Macron saw off far-right rival Marine Le Pen in the second round of the French presidential election at the weekend.

Despite leaders including Joe Biden, Germany’s Olaf Scholz and even China’s Xi Jinping calling the Elysee to congratulate him on his second term, No10 said there was no call scheduled today.

World leaders who have managed to pick up the phone to the Elysee 

Joe Biden (United States)

Xi Jinping (China)

Olaf Scholz (Germany)

The Prime minister’s official spokesman told reporters today there were no plans for them to talk today, adding: ‘You’ll know they’ve spoken very regularly in recent weeks and months and I’m sure that will not change. Not least because of the situation in Ukraine.’

He went on: ‘You will appreciate when it comes to world leaders’ calls, timings can change quite often – both people being exceptionally busy.’

Ministers hope that victory for Macron will trigger an end to the relentless ‘Brit-bashing’ of his campaign and open the door to a new deal on stemming the flow of illegal migration across the Channel.

The Macron administration was seen as talking tough to limit the impact of Le Pen, who comes from an anti-EU, anti-migrant background.

But Downing Street yesterday voiced hopes that a new era of co-operation can now be launched. 

‘Hopefully now his electioneering is out the way we can come together around the table and look at sensible solutions to solve what is a shared problem,’ a Government source said.

Centrist Macron beat Le Pen 58.5 per cent to 41.5 per cent to win re-election on Sunday but Le Pen produced her highest-ever level of support in her three attempts to become France’s leader.

His win will be made official on Wednesday and Macron will hold a Cabinet meeting before setting a date for his inauguration ceremony, which must be held by May 13.

The president will also make a speech tomorrow.

Macron faces a new election battle to keep his Republique en Marche party in control of France’s National Assembly.

The centrist leader will be under pressure in the June polls to convince a divided nation to push through his election manifesto.

His tighter winning margin than in 2017 shows the discontent in France with his domestic record.

Five years ago, Mr Macron’s party won 308 out of 577 seats in the lower house of parliament.

Voters will have to choose between Mr Macron’s pro-EU agenda, Marine Le Pen’s populist National Rally and the radical-Left France Unbowed party led by Jean-Luc Melenchon.

If they can steal seats from Mr Macron’s party or form a coalition to vote down many of his plans, he will effectively be left as a lame-duck president for five years.

Eric Zemmour of the hard-Right Reconquest party has suggested forming a Right-wing alliance to block the leader’s reforms.

Mr Melenchon, who won 22 per cent of the vote in the first round of the presidential election, has said he should become the next French PM in the June polls.

He said: ‘Macron’s election is the worst result of the Fifth Republic. He swims in an ocean of abstentions and spoiled ballots.’

Turnout in French parliamentary elections is usually lower than the presidential vote and was just 42 per cent of eligible voters in 2017.

French economist Christopher Dembik said: ‘He [Mr Macron] risks being a lame duck faced with major social discontent if he wants to implement sensitive reforms such as for pensions.’ 

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