Storm Arwen uprooted HUNDREDS of 'irreplaceable trees'

167ft ‘champion’ coast redwood is among HUNDREDS of ‘irreplaceable trees’ uprooted by Storm Arwen’s gale-force winds, National Trust warns

  • According to the charity, the cost of restorations will likely exceed £3 million 
  • And just the basic clear-up efforts alone are expected to take several months
  • The scale of the destruction was a shock to staff and volunteers, the Trust said
  • The storm’s wake has upset their planned celebrations for National Tree Week 

Hundreds of ‘irreplaceable trees’ were uprooted by Storm Arwen’s gale-force winds — including a 167-feet-tall ‘champion’ coast redwood — the National Trust has said.

The extent of the damage from the storm which began Friday is still being assessed, the conservation charity said, but restoration will likely cost at least £3 million.  

Bodnant Garden in North Wales saw more than 50 trees torn up — including the aforementioned redwood — along with many unique hybrid rhododendrons.

The sheer scale of the devastation left staff in tears, the Trust noted, with the clear-up efforts alone expected to take several months.

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Hundreds of ‘irreplaceable trees’ were uprooted by Storm Arwen’s gale-force winds — including a 167-feet-tall ‘champion’ coast redwood  (pictured) — the National Trust has said

Bodnant Garden in North Wales (pictured) saw more than 50 trees torn up — including the champion coast redwood — along with many unique hybrid rhododendrons

The extent of the damage from the storm which began Friday is still being assessed, the conservation charity said, but restoration will likely cost at least £3 million

The sheer scale of the devastation left staff in tears, the Trust noted, with the clear-up efforts  alone (pictured here beginning at Bodnant Garden) expected to take several months

Out in the COLD! 30,000 homes spend FIFTH night without power in Arwen’s wake

Desperate residents have been left without power for a fifth night after Storm Arwen battered homes across the north of England and Scotland.

About 30,000 homes were still cut off from the grid this morning following ferocious gales, rain and snow that tore through infrastructure last week.

It will be at least the end of the week — seven days after the devastating storm — before electricity is restored to some, the Energy Networks Association warned today.

It comes as the Met Office issued a two-day ice warning and said there could be more snow and sub-zero weather on the way.

Meteorologists put out the hazard update for tonight and tomorrow morning covering northern Scotland and the North East of England. 

Around Wallington Hall, in Northumberland, thousands of trees came down as winds reached speeds of up to 98 miles per hour (158 kph).

Among those uprooted were more than half of a generation of 250-year-old oak and beech trees planted by the baronet and politician Sir Walter Calverley Blackett.

The property itself — a Grade I listed building — is without power, phone lines and water, while all the surrounding footpaths are blocked, the National Trust said.

In the Lake District, meanwhile, the charity’s staff are still in the process of counting the number of trees brought down, but expect the figure to be in the thousands.

Hundreds of trees were similarly lost on estates such as Wray Castle, Fell Foot and Sizergh — while at Tarn Hows, a 19th century landscape once owned by Beatrix Potter, fallen trees and debris are blocking access roads and paths.

Other National Trust properties that were badly affected include Hardcastle Crags in West Yorkshire, Erddig near Wrexham, Cragside in Northumberland and Attingham Park in Shropshire.

At Bodnant Garden, the storm had delivered a ‘huge blow to British heritage’, taking down some of the property’s earliest and most important specimen trees, said National Trust head of gardens and parklands, Andy Jasper.

‘With it being National Tree Week we had expected to be celebrating the extraordinary trees in our care — not witnessing the scale of destruction we have.

‘But this week has taken on a new significance for us, and we’re asking our supporters to donate, if they can, to help us restore the places affected.’

The gardens and landscapes would take months just to clear up and years or even decades to fully restore, he added – while some would never be the same again.

‘We will also make sure that this restoration work is as resilient as possible to extreme weather events of this kind — which are becoming ever more common as the climate changes,’ he noted.

Around Wallington Hall, in Northumberland, thousands of trees came down as winds reached speeds of up to 98 miles per hour (158 kph). Pictured: the damage at Bodnant Garden

At Bodnant Garden, the storm had delivered a ‘huge blow to British heritage’, taking down some of the property’s earliest and most important specimen trees, said National Trust head of gardens and parklands, Andy Jasper. Pictured: the champion redwood seen in better times

Wallington Hall — a Grade I listed building — is without power, phone lines and water, while all the surrounding footpaths are blocked, the National Trust said. Pictured: uprooted trees

In the Lake District the charity’s staff are still in the process of counting the number of trees brought down, but expect the figure to be in the thousands. Pictured:the National Trust is in the process of clearing the devastation in the wake of Storm Arwen

Hundreds of trees were similarly lost on estates such as Wray Castle, Fell Foot and Sizergh — while at Tarn Hows, a 19th century landscape once owned by Beatrix Potter, fallen trees and debris are blocking access roads and paths. Pictured: trees uprooted by the gale-force winds

‘It’s been a real shock to staff and volunteers coming in to see the devastation caused in one night. There have been tears,’ said Bodnant Garden’s acting head gardener, Adam Salvin.

‘We’ve seen storms and floods here before but this damage is on a scale not seen in living memory,’ he added.

The National Trust has advised prospective visitors to its sites in northern Wales and England to check property websites before setting out, as some places remain closed while walking routes at others may have changed due to the damage.

Other National Trust properties that were badly affected include Hardcastle Crags in West Yorkshire, Erddig near Wrexham, Cragside in Northumberland and Attingham Park in Shropshire. Pictured: a large tree on a National Trust site that was uprooted by Arwen

‘With it being National Tree Week we had expected to be celebrating the extraordinary trees in our care — not witnessing the scale of destruction we have,’ added Mr Jasper ‘But this week has taken on a new significance for us, and we’re asking our supporters to donate, if they can, to help us restore the places affected’

‘It’s been a real shock to staff and volunteers coming in to see the devastation caused in one night. There have been tears,’ said Bodnant Garden’s Adam Salvin. ‘We’ve seen storms and floods here before but this damage is on a scale not seen in living memory,’ he added

WHAT CAN TREE RINGS TELL US? 

Trees can live for hundreds—and sometimes even thousands—of years. 

Over this long lifetime, a tree can experience a variety of environmental conditions: wet years, dry years, cold years, hot years, early frosts, forest fires and more. 

Concentric rings in tree trunks tell us how old the tree is, and what the weather was like during each year of the tree’s life. 

The light-coloured rings represent wood that grew in the spring and early summer, while the dark rings represent wood that grew in the late summer and fall. One light ring plus one dark ring equals one year of the tree’s life.

Because trees are sensitive to local climate conditions, such as rain and temperature, they give scientists some information about that area’s local climate in the past.

Concentric rings in tree trunks tell us how old the tree is, and what the weather was like during each year of the tree’s life. One light ring plus one dark ring equals one year of the tree’s life

 For example, tree rings usually grow wider in warm, wet years and they are thinner in years when it is cold and dry.

 If the tree has experienced stressful conditions, such as a drought, the tree might hardly grow at all in those years.

Very old trees can offer clues about what the climate was like long before measurements were recorded. This field—the study of past climates—is called paleoclimatology.

Paleoclimatologists rely upon natural sources of climate data, such as tree rings, cores drilled from Antarctic ice and sediment collected from the bottom of lakes and oceans. These sources, called proxies, can extend our knowledge of weather and climate from hundreds to millions of years 

Combined with weather and climate information from satellites, they can help scientists model major climate events that shaped our planet in the past. 

And these models can also help us make predictions about what climate patterns to expect in the future. 

 SOURCE: NASA

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