Brexit news latest – EU trade talk PANIC as deadline looms and discussions move from London to Brussels to strike deal

TRADE talks are set to move to Brussels tomorrow as the deadline to find a Brexit deal is just a few weeks away.

Michel Barnier and Lord Frost are set to meet in the Belgian capital for further negotiations.

A European Commission spokesman said on Tuesday: “I can confirm that negotiations are ongoing in London right now, they will run until tomorrow and then they will take place here in Brussels, as of Thursday.”

The EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier is now warning that "time is very short" to secure a Brexit trade deal, with the key sticking point appearing to be reaching an agreement over French fishing rights.

Ex Brexit Party MEP Ben Habib warned the next few days are so vital that they'll not only decide the success of Brexit, but also whether Boris Johnson stands a chance against Labour's Keir Starmer at the next General Election.

"We are in the final days of determining what sort of Brexit Boris Johnson will deliver. The political consequences of not taking back control of our laws borders cash and fish would be vast," he tweeted.

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

 

  • Chris Bradford

    DEAL POSSIBLE IN TWO WEEKS, SAYS IRISH FOREIGN MINISTER

    Ireland's foreign minister Simon Coveney has said it's likely that a Brexit agreement will be likely in the next two weeks, but warned it would be far from easy.

    “We're likely to get a deal, but it won't be easy,” Mr Coveney told an Irish Farmers Journal webinar yesterday.

    “If there's no trade deal, it will be on the basis of WTO standards.”

    Mr Coveney said a no-trade deal Brexit is what the EU is working towards.

    The minister said “the time is up” and there would be no further extension to the negotiations so people need to be prepared for change in January.

  • Chris Bradford

    CBI CHIEF URGES GOVERNMENT TO GET A DEAL

    The head of the CBI has urged the government to conclude Brexit talks so the UK can move on from the “suspended animation” of the past four years.

    Speaking about her five years as director of the CBI, Dame Carolyn Fairbairn said her biggest regret was that the issue was not resolved earlier and warned government ministers that businesses grappling with Covid-19 were not prepared for a “hard” Brexit.

    Negotiations have intensified as the EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier is in London and trade talks will continue in Brussels from Thursday.

    Fairbairn, who steps down next week, said: “The thing that's painful is that it has taken so long to get to a resolution. I think we will get a deal. The remaining issues look soluble.”

  • Britta Zeltmann

    'MOST DIFFICULT STAGE'

    Brexit negotiations are at their most difficult stage, the president of the European Council warned on Tuesday, The Telegraph reports.

    “We all know that, in all negotiations, the last and final decisions are the most difficult,” Charles Michel, who chairs summits of EU leaders in Brussels, said.

    “Will we get a deal? I don't know – it will depend on what will be on the table.”

  • Britta Zeltmann

    SLOW PRICE DROP

    Prices in British shops fell more slowly this month than in September, figures from the British Retail Consortium showed on Wednesday.

    The BRC said its shop price index showed a 1.2% annual fall in prices in October compared with a 1.6% drop in September.

    Food prices rose by an annual 1.2% in both months, but the fall in non-food prices slowed to 2.7% from September's 3.2%.

    Official data showed purchases of non-food items exceed pre-pandemic levels last month, but BRC chief executive Helen Dickinson said she expected the squeeze on many retailers' profit margins to continue.

    “Given the wider economic context, with stricter restrictions and a possible rise in unemployment, we are likely to see continuing discounts in non-food for months to come,” she said.

    The BRC also warned prices would rise if Britain failed to secure a zero-tariff trade agreement with the European Union before post-Brexit transition arrangements expire at the end of this year.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    NEW PROTECTIONS FOR DOGGER BANK AND OTHER MARINE SITES

    Important habitats in UK waters including Dogger Bank could get greater protection under potential new management plans for marine reserves.

    The Marine Management Organisation, which regulates and manages the seas, is launching a call for evidence on new proposals to manage five of England's marine protected areas after Brexit.

    Areas which could see greater protection include the Canyons, a deep sea habitat off the coast of Cornwall which harbours cold water corals, and Dogger Bank, a shallow sandbank in the North Sea, home to species such as sand eels, which are food for puffins and porpoises.

    Dogger Bank has recently been the focus of protests by Greenpeace, which dropped boulders into the marine reserve to create an underwater barrier to prevent bottom trawling which they warned was damaging the habitat.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    GOVERNMENT URGED TO SET OUT AMBITIOUS CLIMATE PLANS

    Youth campaigners, faith leaders, health professionals, academics and Conservative MPs have called for the UK to set out ambitious new climate plans.

    A series of letters to the Government is urging action ahead of a UK-UN climate summit on December 12 to mark the fifth anniversary of the international Paris Agreement on tackling global warming.

    After Brexit, the UK, which was previously covered by the European Union's plans under the Paris Agreement, must produce its own national determined contribution.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    BREXIT MAKES BRITAIN 'LESS USEFUL TO THE US'

    A former diplomat has claimed Brexit makes Britain “less useful to the US”, Politico reports.

    Peter Ricketts said: “When Biden looks towards Europe, he will see Paris and Berlin more as the centre of gravity of what’s really important for America in Europe, both economically and in security terms, and Britain will be seen rather as an outlier, rather outside the mainstream of Europe.

    “There will continue to be an important bilateral relationship on defence and security of course, but in other areas, Britain will not have the same prominence it has been used to having in Washington because, frankly, Britain is less useful to the US administration.”

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    'TIME IS SHORT'

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s spokesman said there is very little time left to bridge significant gaps between Britain and the European Union’s positions.

    “There is also much work to be done if we’re going to bridge what are the significant gaps that remain between our positions in the most difficult areas and time is very short,” the spokesman said.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    TALKS TO CONTINUE IN BRUSSELS

    Michel Barnier and Lord Frost are set to meet in Brussels on Thursday after a week of talks in London.

    A European Commission spokesman said: “I can confirm that negotiations are ongoing in London right now, they will run until tomorrow and then they will take place here in Brussels, as of Thursday.”

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    SPAIN AND GIBRALTAR SEEK LAST-MINUTE DEAL

    Spain and Gibraltar are reportedly seeking a last-minute Brexit deal, according to the FT.

    Arancha González, Spain’s foreign minister, and Fabian Picardo, Gibraltar chief minister, said the two sides could reach a “practical” deal that would limit disruption for thousands of cross-border workers.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    NEW DEADLINE

    The UK and EU are hoping to agree a trade deal by mid-November.

    That would give the European Parliament time to scrutinise and ratify the deal before the end of the transition period at the end of this year.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    BREXIT TALKS 'AT MOST DIFFICULT POINT'

    European Council President Charles Michel warned that Brexit negotiations are at their most difficult stage, The Telegraph reports.

    He said: “Will we get a deal? I don't know – it will depend on what will be on the table.”

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    CONFIDENCE IS KEY

    Charles Michel added: “We all know that in all negotiations, the last and final decisions are the most difficult. Will we get a deal? I don’t know, it will depend on what will be on the table.

    “But we are working in order to make sure all member states are well informed, are involved in the process in order to make sure there is confidence – which is key in order to able to decide.”

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    BREXIT DEAL HANGS IN BALANCE

    European council president Charles Michel has said Brussels is still unsure whether a deal is possible within the next two weeks.

    He said: “In my opinion it’s very clear that it is necessary to work seriously, [which is] what we are trying to do, with full trust for Michel Barnier and his team, and we will assess in the next days or in the next weeks, when we consider it is time to assess, what is the result of the talks that are ongoing.”

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    BORIS TWEETS WRONG SCOTT MORRISON INSTEAD OF AUSSIE PM

    Boris Johnson tweeted out a friendly thank you to the Australian Prime Minister after a call today – but tagged wrong the Scott Morrison.

    The PM and the Aussie leader had talks today over hopes of a new free trade deal, but an unsuspecting Twitter user by the same name was praised instead.

    The PM quickly corrected the bungled tweet – tagging @ScottMorrisonMP instead of the Twitter user with the same name.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    BARNIER IN LONDON UNTIL TOMORROW

    Michel Barnier will be in London until tomorrow.

    After the EU's chief negotiator returns to Brussels, discussions will continue there.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    LOOKING FORWARD

    Britain must spell out how far it wants to diverge from European Union rules if it wants access to the bloc's financial market from January, a top European Commission official said on Tuesday.

    John Berrigan, head of the European Commission's financial services unit, said Brussels has asked London for more clarification on Britain's intentions to work out what is an “acceptable level” of divergence.

    “We are almost ready,” Berrigan told the European Parliament.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    NO DEAL BREXIT WILL COST EU £30 BILLION A YEAR

    No Deal will cost the EU a whopping £30 billion a year in lost trade with Britain, experts warned last night.

    Germany, the Netherlands, and France will be hit the hardest if the Brexit talks fail, according to a bombshell report.

    But if a trade agreement is found the impact on businesses in major European economies would be roughly halved.

    Click here to read more

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    TESTY RELATIONS

    A tell-all tome from former government spin doctor Peter Cardwell published today will pour petrol on testy relations between the PM and his senior backbenchers such as Sir Iain.

    Mr Cardwell lifts the lid on his long career in Whitehall serving as a bag carrier and media handler for a number of Cabinet Ministers before being brutally sacked last February.

    And he recalls in detail a “farcical scene” in July 2019 in the week before Mr Johnson was crowned Tory leader and PM in his book The Secret Life of Special Advisers published today.

    A senior Tory source said: “It seems this book is more a work of fiction than an autobiography but we wish Peter well.”

    More on the story here

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    EXCLUSIVE: BORIS 'HID IN A BEDROOM' TO AVOID TALKING TO IAIN DUNCAN SMITH ABOUT BREXIT

    Boris Johnson hid in a bedroom just days before he became PM to avoid having to talk to Sir Iain Duncan Smith about Brexit, an explosive new book claims.

    It says the soon-to-be Premier and his aides pretended not to home while Sir Iain – who was meant to be chairing Mr Johnson's leadership campaign – banged on the front door unaware they had concealed themselves upstairs.

    The book says: “With IDS en route, Boris quickly ordered his entire team to race up the stairs to the first floor of the house and, well, hide from their alleged campaign chairman as he rapped on the door of the building, demanding to be let in.

    “Eventually, IDS gave up knocking on the door and ringing the bell, and the Johnson team gingerly made their way downstairs again to their makeshift offices to resume their work.”

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    FRAGMENTING EVENT

    EU's Berrigan has said Brexit will be an unavoidably fragmenting event for financial markets.

  • Chiara Fiorillo

    A LOT AT STAKE

    Every year Ireland exports about 5.5 billion euro worth of food and drink to the UK.

    In the absence of a trade deal tariffs worth between 1.35 billion and 1.5 billion euro would be levied, Ireland's Foreign Affairs Minister said.

    In such a scenario Simon Coveney said in the short term Irish products would become more expensive, but in the medium term the UK could “look elsewhere” for cheaper products.

    “That is not what we want to see,” he warned. “There's a lot at stake over the next 10 to 14 days.”

  • Chris Bradford

    IRISH FOREIGN MINISTER: TALKS HAVE ENTERED 'VERY SERIOUS ZONE OF NEGOTIATION'

    The Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney has said a Brexit trade deal is likely, but warned negotiations have entered a “very serious zone of negotiation”.

    Mr Coveney said he wasn't underestimating the challenges that both teams of negotiators are facing.

    He put a 10-day to two week timetable to reach an agreement, which he said was the “realistic” timeline, RTE reports.

    “We're likely to get a deal but it won't be easy,” Mr Coveney told an Irish Farmers Journal webinar.

    “The cost of failure politically is very expensive for all sides, that's why we are likely to get a deal. But, it won't be easy,” he said.

  • Chris Bradford

    'SUPREME FOLLY'

    A Tory peer has warned the Government that putting the Good Friday Agreement at risk would be an act of “supreme folly” as the controversial Internal Market Bill is scrutinised

    Lord Cormack said it was crucial that the UK government did not do anything that could lead to the return of a hard border on island of Ireland.

    “It would be an act of supreme folly if anything we did in this Parliament endangered the continuity of the Good Friday Agreement,” he told the Lords yesterday.

    ““It is absolutely crucial that each and every one of us recognises this in whatever party we sit, or on the cross benches.

    “It is nothing to do with whether you are on the Brexit side or the Remainer side, that argument is over.”

  • Chris Bradford

    DOING A DEAL

    Spain and Gibraltar are reportedly seeking a last-minute agreement which aims at making Brexit less disruptive for their citizens when the transition period ends on December 31.

    The proposed agreement would aim to ensure free movement continues across the Gibraltan border, the Financial Times reports.

    Arancha González, Spain's foreign minister, told the newspaper that an agreement could make the upcoming changes “simpler” and “less costly”.

    Gibraltar is set to face disruption when Britain and its overseas territories leave the single market and customs union at the end of the year.

    All political parties and politicians supported a remain vote at the time of the referendum and 95.9 per cent of those who voted in 2016 backed staying in the EU.

Source: Read Full Article