UK weather forecast today – Brits to bake in another 29C sizzler after temperatures hit four-year high

BRITS are set to bake in another 29C sizzler after temperatures hit a four-year high on Tuesday.

The last blast of summer weather will stick around into mid-week thanks to a 1,500 mile-wide Saharan burst of hot air passing over Britain.

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Thousands sizzled on beaches and in parks on Monday as the mercury soared to 31C.

It was the first time temperatures have topped 30C since 2016. The September average is 18C.

Although cooler weather is expected in the North, the South could again reach highs of 29C for Wednesday.

The warmer weather is down to a combination of tropical air pushing up from the south and light winds, the Met Office said.

Forecaster Bonnie Diamond added: “It definitely feels like one last blast of summer even though we are, meteorologically speaking, in autumn.”

September has been the warmest since 2016 and follows an August heatwave when temperatures topped 34C for six days running.

The scorching weather will ease off through the end of the week as colder air sweeps in to Britain from the Atlantic.


Folk flocked to resorts including Blackpool and Bournemouth with many breaking the Government’s “rule of six”.

Britain was also hotter than Crete (27C), Ibiza (28C) and Antigua (30C).

The Met Office and Public Health England even issued a heat-health alert for London and the South East.

Deputy chief meteorologist Chris Tubbs said: “Thursday and Friday will be fine and dry for most.

“Whilst it’ll be cooler for northern areas with the chance of frost in rural spots overnight, it’ll stay warm in southern and eastern parts.”

The mini-heatwave comes just as Boris Johnson has tightened coronavirus restrictions – limiting Brits to meeting in groups of six.

Under strict new coronavirus rules, larger social gatherings indoors and outdoors will be illegal in a bid to beat the spread of infection.

Those who flout it will face a £100 fine, doubling on each offence up to a maximum of £3,200.






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